Faith healer hopes to add uncle’s name to Tobermore war memorial

David Watters Vice Chairman of Tobermore War Memorial Committee pictured alongside Danny Gallagher healer at the War Memorial  which recognise the service of both his father and uncle  in WW1.
Danny said: "I would like to thank David Watters, Tobermore Maghera and Mr Spears for engraving my late father and his brother's name on the War Memorial . My late father was Michael Gallagher and his brother was Eddie Gallagher from Blackhill  Draperstown  were both  machine Gunners in the war they both survived the war."
David Watters Vice Chairman of Tobermore War Memorial Committee pictured alongside Danny Gallagher healer at the War Memorial which recognise the service of both his father and uncle in WW1. Danny said: "I would like to thank David Watters, Tobermore Maghera and Mr Spears for engraving my late father and his brother's name on the War Memorial . My late father was Michael Gallagher and his brother was Eddie Gallagher from Blackhill Draperstown were both machine Gunners in the war they both survived the war."

International faith healer Danny Gallagher has managed to get the World War One service record for his uncle Patrick after a lengthy search.

Readers will recall that the Maghera man traced the service record for his father Michael, who served as a machine-gunner before returning home to Tobermore at the end of the war.

His name - along with that of another brother, Eddie - was added to the new war memorial in the centre of the village.

Danny then turned his attention to finding the record of Patrick and, with help from Heather Kelly Bainbridge, unearthed more details of the soldier’s service in 1914.

He now hopes to have Patrick’s name added to the village memorial, which was officially unveiled last summer.

The Gallagher brothers - Michael, Joe, Eddie and Patrick - joined the 16th Royal Irish Rifles in December 1915 and fortunately survived the conflict.

They all hailed from the townland of Tamneyaskey - Blackhill area - of Tobermore.

Speaking about his father, Danny said: “My father would have been very proud to have his name on the memorial as his service in the war went unrecognised.”

Michael was wounded in the arm and leg during the war. As well as fighting at the Somme, he saw action in the Battle of Guillemont and the German Spring Offensive (1918) - and he carried the scars of conflict until his death at the age of 59.

“He would have jumped out of bed at night for no reason,” Danny recalled. “You could tell that the memories of the war lived with him. That is why I am so happy his name is on the war memorial along with Eddie’s. It gives him the recognition he didn’t have in life.”

His future efforts will be to find the war record of his uncle Joe.

Danny stressed he is neither motivated by religion or politics and is solely interested in getting his father and uncles the recognition they deserved for the courage they displayed.

Approximately 350 people from Tobermore and surrounding area served in the armed forces during the First World War and many never returned home.