Housing Association trying to find source of ‘foul odours’ in Dungannon

Dungannon SDLP councillor Denise Mullen, who has been contacted by residents of the Woodlawn Drive/Woodlawn Park areas of the town about foul odours.
Dungannon SDLP councillor Denise Mullen, who has been contacted by residents of the Woodlawn Drive/Woodlawn Park areas of the town about foul odours.

Foul odours which are making life a misery for people living in a Dungannon housing development, may be the result of “inappropriate” items being flushed, it has been reported.

While a housing association responsible for a development of new properties in the Woodlawn Park area of the town says it is unable to confirm the source of the problem, the TIMES has been told that the improper disposal of items such as baby’s nappies could be one potential cause of the problem.

People living in the Woodlawn Park and Woodlawn Drive areas contacted local SDLP councillor, Denise Mullen, in a bid to find a solution to the long-standing problem.

The TIMES has learned that while the issue has been an ongoing one, the smell affecting those living in these areas has been exacerbated since the construction of the new social housing properties.

The TIMES contacted Habinteg Housing Association (Ulster) Ltd, which has responsibilty for the new houses, and explained the frustration of residents who say they are often forced to leave their homes because the odours are so bad.

A spokesperson for the organisation said in a statement: “We are currently investigating reports of an odour arising from drains close to our properties at Woodlawn Park.

“Until those investigations are complete, we are unable to confirm the source of the problem but we can assure residents in the area that we will do all within our remit to resolve this issue.”

Meanwhile, a spokesman for Northern Ireland Water told the TIMES that a thorough clean-through of the local sewers would be carried out “as a courtesy” to customers.

“NI Water has recently investigated reports of an odour in the Woodlawn area of Dungannon”, the spokesman explained.

“A camera survey of our sewerage infrastructure in the area has been completed, and we can confirm that no defects were found. It appears the odour has been emanating from a private drain, which the customer has been advised to have cleaned.”

While the matter will be kept under review, according to NI Water, the organisation also issued a reminder to customers:

“Flushing items like household wipes, sanitary towels, nappies etc is a very common cause of blockages across Northern Ireland, and NI Water is literally fighting a daily battle to keep our sewers clear, at a cost of £2.5 million per year. Further information on our ‘Dirty Dozen’ awareness campaign can be found at www.niwater.com”