Mid Ulster to host final debate on centenaries in Burnavon

Pictured with the Chair of Mid Ulster District Council, Councillor Linda Dillon at one of the Series of Talks are (l-r) Oliver Morgan, Mid Ulster District Council and Dr Eamon Phoenix, speaker.

Pictured with the Chair of Mid Ulster District Council, Councillor Linda Dillon at one of the Series of Talks are (l-r) Oliver Morgan, Mid Ulster District Council and Dr Eamon Phoenix, speaker.

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Mid Ulster District Council’s Remembering the Future Series of Talks marking the significance of 2016 in a decade of centenaries will draw to a close with a panel debate on Wednesday, 13 April.

The finale event, entitled ‘1916 A Challenging Debate’ will take place at the Burnavon, Cookstown at 7pm.

The debate brings to a close the Council’s ‘Series of Talks’ programme which considered aspects of the 1916 Easter Rising and the Battle of the Somme and consisted of five talks exploring different themes being delivered across the district between the end of January and the end of March.

Dr Eamon Phoenix, who delivered the first talk ‘The North Began’: The 1916 Rising and Ulster, returns once more to facilitate the debate along with panel members Dr Fearghal McBloscaidh (who spoke at the fourth talk ‘Tom Clarke, Republicanism in Tyrone & 1916 Rising’), Rev Professor Laurence S Kirkpatrick and Friends of the Somme, Mid Ulster Branch (who delivered the third talk ‘Irish Catholic Chaplains in the British Armed Forces during the First World War & The Tyrone Volunteers and the Great War.)

Each of the five talks have been full to capacity with people of all ages and from all sections of the community.

Two accompanying exhibitions will continue to be on display throughout March and April. ‘Their Story’ on loan from County Museum, Dundalk examines the involvement of the 16th (Irish) and 36th (Ulster) divisions in World War One, the motivations of those who enlisted, their training and experiences at the Somme. The role played by the Irish language movement in the broad Irish revival period from the late 19th Century to the early 20th Century, with a focus on the 1916 Easter Rising, is also told in an exhibition.