Dullest and wettest June for five years, warmer than usual

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The Armagh Observatory has reported that June 2017 was dull, wet and warmer than average.

It was the dullest and wettest June at Armagh for five years, that is, since June 2012.

June 2017 recorded a total of just 97.5 hours of strong sunshine.

This is a little more than half the long-term (1881–2010) average number of hours of strong June sunshine at Armagh, and two-thirds of the most recent (1981–2010) 30-year June average.

It was the fifth dullest June at Armagh on record.

The sunniest day was the 2nd, with just 10.6 hours of strong sunshine.

Total precipitation was 77.85 mm (approximately 3 inches) including 7 trace values, that is, 77.5 mm if trace values are ignored.

This was approximately a fifth more than the long-term (1838–2010) average June rainfall at Armagh and a third more than the most recent (1981–2010) 30-year June average.

There were just five days with no measurable or trace of precipitation. The wettest day was the 26th, with 14.6 mm (nearly 0.6 inches) of rainfall.

The mean temperature was 14.9 degrees Celsius (58.8 F), approximately 1.5 C warmer than the long-term (1796–2010) June average and 1.1 C warmer than the most recent (1981–2010) 30-year average June temperature at Armagh.

The warmest day (highest maximum air temperature) was 26.6 C.

This occurred on the 21st June and was the warmest June day at Armagh for eight years, that is, since 26.7 C recorded on 2nd June 2009.

The coolest day (lowest maximum air temperature) was 13.5 C on the 29th, and the coolest night (lowest minimum air temperature) was 7.3 C on the 4th.

The warmest night (highest minimum air temperature) was 14.1 C, which occurred on both the 19th and 21st.

Among three nights with ground frost (minimum grass temperature less than or equal to zero Celsius), the coldest was -2.4 C on the 4th.

There were no nighttime air frosts.

The weather observer noted a rainbow on the evening of the 10th June, and buzzards were seen over the Astropark mid-morning on the 12th.

Thunder was recorded on the 21st, the longest day of the year.

These data refer to observations at Armagh Observatory, which has been recording the weather at Armagh since 1795.