Tyrone and Derry amongst least favourite holiday destinations in Ireland

The house is flanked on either side by a long low building. These outbuildings were used by servants, the senior staff occupying the building on the left and the junior staff the building on the right.

The house is flanked on either side by a long low building. These outbuildings were used by servants, the senior staff occupying the building on the left and the junior staff the building on the right.

0
Have your say

Residents of beautiful Tyrone and Derry will be horrified to hear that their beloved counties have been voted amongst the least favourite destinations to visit on holiday.

Kerry made it three-in-a-row by topping the poll for the third year running with Galway and Cork next in the poll.

The survey was conducted by MyHome.ie who described how neither Derry or Tyrone attracted a single vote alongside Carlow, Longford, Roscommon and Monaghan.

“Given that that the survey came from a web site which doesn’t offer holiday properties in this part of the world, the results are perhaps not that surprising,” said a spokesperson for Mid Ulster Council.

“For anyone looking at this area as a destination, they’d find it steeped history and heritage, with places like Hill of the O’Neill and Tullaghoge, to name but two of the 96 archaeology sites nestled in the Sperrins.

“In fact, you travel through an imaginary timeline from the Neolithic times in Beaghmore Stone Circles, to the Hill of the O’Neill and Tullaghoge Fort from the 11th Century to 1602 when Lord Mountjoy smashed the inauguration chair against the O’Neills, to the plantation period which saw beautiful houses such as Springhill, Bellaghy Bawn, Lissan House, Ballyscullion House and Killymoon castle built, right up to World War II when the American army built an aerodrome in Ardboe.

“Mid Ulster also has an unparalleled range of outdoor activities for visitors – the world class mountain bike trails at Davagh are just one example – great shopping towns and a reputation for excellent eateries.

“The Council recognises that the area also has significant potential to increase its visitor numbers, raise its profile as a tourism destination and contribute to economic growth in the sector.

“This has been and remains a priority area for action, evidenced by the on-going investment in the development and promotion of key heritage sites, and the development of the new facility in Bellaghy which will showcase the life and work of the late Seamus Heaney.”