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Couple admit their part in mortgage fraud

PACEMAKER BELFAST
A leading republican has admitted more than �250,000 of mortgage fraud.
Brian Joseph Arthurs, 48, pleaded guilty to three charges of obtaining a money transfer by deception and two counts of possessing �31,718 worth of criminal property.
His wife, Paula Anne, 49, admitted obtaining a money transfer of �52,000 by deception.
The couple from Finulagh Road, Castlecaulfield, had been due to stand trial at Belfast Crown Court.
But they changed their plea on Wednesday.
Subsequently, further charges of obtaining services by deception and possessing and converting criminal property were left on the books.
Arthurs admitted making three fraudulent mortgage applications totalling �345,250 from the Bank of Ireland, Birmingham Midshires and The Mortgage Business PLC.

PACEMAKER BELFAST A leading republican has admitted more than �250,000 of mortgage fraud. Brian Joseph Arthurs, 48, pleaded guilty to three charges of obtaining a money transfer by deception and two counts of possessing �31,718 worth of criminal property. His wife, Paula Anne, 49, admitted obtaining a money transfer of �52,000 by deception. The couple from Finulagh Road, Castlecaulfield, had been due to stand trial at Belfast Crown Court. But they changed their plea on Wednesday. Subsequently, further charges of obtaining services by deception and possessing and converting criminal property were left on the books. Arthurs admitted making three fraudulent mortgage applications totalling �345,250 from the Bank of Ireland, Birmingham Midshires and The Mortgage Business PLC.

A CASTLECAULFIELD couple have admitted being involved in mortgage fraud totalling a quarter of a million pounds.

Prominent republican, Brian Joseph Arthurs, 48, and his 49 year-old wife Paula, from Finulagh Road in the village, had been due to go on trial at Belfast Crown Court on Wednesday, but their lawyers asked for some of the charges to be put to them again.

Brian Arthurs pleaded guilty to three charges of obtaining a money transfer by deception, as well as two further counts of possessing criminal property to a total of £31,718.

Paula Arthurs, meanwhile, admitted a single charge of obtaining a money transfer by deception, namely a £52,000 mortgage from the Bank of Ireland on a date unknown between 3 November 1996 and 10 January 1997.

The couple had faced further charges of obtaining services by deception, possessing and converting criminal property but after they pleaded guilty, prosecuting QC Liam McCollum asked Belfast Recorder Judge David McFarland to leave those counts “on the books, not to be proceeded with”.

According to the indictment, Brian Arthurs admitted to three fraudulent but successful mortgage applications totalling £345,250, borrowed from three lending companies, namely the Bank of Ireland, Birmingham Midshires and The Mortgage Business PLC.

In the particulars of each charge, it is apparent that Brian Arthurs inflated his income by £34,500, claiming he had another job and had no other debts while his wife Paula claimed to the Bank of Ireland she was a hair salon manageress earning £18,500.

Arthurs was once a member of the Sinn Féin party and had acted as an election agent on behalf of Michelle Gildernew but back in 1995, he was handed a 25-year jail term for possessing explosives, later released in 2000 under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement.

Judge McFarland adjourned both passing sentence and a confiscation application under the Proceeds of Crime Act for two weeks.

Releasing the couple on bail, he warned them however that was “no indication” as to the possible sentence they will face.

 
 
 

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