Ballygawley speed cameras rake in £35K during past year

New signage at the new larger Ballygawley roundabout directing traffic from the west towards the new A4 carriageway.
New signage at the new larger Ballygawley roundabout directing traffic from the west towards the new A4 carriageway.

A Ballygawley road is one of the worst for speeding in Northern Ireland, it has been revealed.

Speed cameras at the Ballygawley roundabout have raked in £35,220 in the past year alone after nabbing 587 speeding motorists.

This means that more than ten a week are caught at the busy roundabout, putting it in the top fifteen speeding hotspots across Northern Ireland.

Almost 1,000 drivers are being snapped by speed cameras every week across Northern Ireland.

The number of detections has trebled over the last decade following a blitz on speeding motorists.

More than 48,000 road users were clocked driving too fast in just 12 months.

The most prolific camera caught 6,534 offenders in 2013 - around one every hour of the day.

Each offence normally results in a £60 fine.

Police have warned that excess speed is a key factor behind the increasing death toll on our roads, which has so far claimed 65 lives. However, opponents of speed cameras say they are cash cows.

Elsewhere, speed cameras on the Drum Road, Cookstown, raked in £33,960 in the past year after nabbing 566 speeding motorists.

A further two local roads hit the top 60 list. Roadside cameras on the A29 Cookstown Road and the Magherafelt Road, Moneymore, raked in £8,100 in the past year in speeding fines.

The Magherafelt road speeding checks nabbed 99 drivers in the past year, while the A29 caught 36.

Almost 1,000 drivers are being snapped by speed cameras every week across Northern Ireland.

The number of detections has trebled over the last decade following a blitz on speeding motorists.

More than 48,000 road users were clocked driving too fast in just 12 months.

The most prolific camera caught 6,534 offenders in 2013 - around one every hour of the day.

Each offence normally results in a £60 fine, meaning that camera alone could have raked in as much as £392,000 last year.

In total, the cameras could have generated £2,899,920 from all speeding offences.

Police have warned that excess speed is a key factor behind the increasing death toll on our roads, which has so far claimed 65 lives.

However, opponents of speed cameras say they are merely cash cows which have little impact on road safety.

Inspector Rosie Leech of the PSNI’s Road Policing Unit said: “Speed, or more accurately, excessive speed, is consistently the principal single cause of the most serious road traffic collisions in which people are killed or seriously injured on roads across Northern Ireland.

“So far this year, 65 people have lost their lives on the roads here.

“Many, if not the majority of these collisions, could have been avoided, therefore this is an appalling waste of life and the devastation this brings to families, friends and local communities is immeasurable.”

Last year there were three times as many motorists caught speeding compared to 2004.

The main reason was a decrease in the threshold at which a driver could be detected speeding in June 2010 and April 2012.